A postindustrial circular structure based on rational, geometric forms that utilizes a neglected piece of land in the city.

Inspired by the great halls of medieval times, the new two-storey atrium is meant to bring the lines of sight within the house up toward the sky and the treetops.

In the last few years, the environmental consequences of cement and plastic have become dire. With this in mind, the government of British Columbia has undertaken a new initiative to fund and explore the building of massive wooden structures.

A stunning restoration of a house built in the 1990s by Daniel Evan White, who was an acolyte of Arthur Erickson and translated the West Coast Modern idiom into a slick contemporary style.

“A lot of people affiliate contemporary architecture with the boxy shape, but I don’t think that shape has to define the style,” Bortolotto says.

Scott Specht says that his greatest influence for Sangre de Cristo House was the Land art movement, which has always worked well with the expansive natural canvas that is the desert.

A facade of mahogany slats is inspired by the way branches provide shade yet allow sunlight to enter, creating the inside-outside blurring that both West Coast Modern homes and many East Asian styles are famous for.

A staid brutalism flirts with airy woods, with the percentage of both varying from room to room, as if a dualism is playing out in the materials.

Her firm’s philosophy counters the monumentalism of Europe with the expansive territory of the Americas so that the architecture is “confused” with the environment.

Partisans has been making waves in the Canadian architecture scene with a unique combinations of futuristic wave forms and wood. In this stunning house, the waves are literal.

More characteristic of an artist studio or an installation, the showroom allows clients to see the pieces in situ, inspiring onlookers to appreciate the creative prowess of the company and the city from which it comes.

Made with prefabricated materials from BC Passive House in Pemberton, Buckhorn represents the lineage of passive housing in British Columbia, which began in in the province during the 2010 Olympics with the Lost Lake PassivHaus.

The story behind this home sounds like that of an intrepid pioneer, which gives the evident contemporaneousness of the building an extra layer of charm.

Viberg works with small, old-world manufacturers, including family-run tanneries across Europe.

Knowledge of a place generally helps shape structure, and the only way to achieve such knowledge is through being with the environment.

Interestingly, Hadid got her start in object design and interiors, so in many ways this chess set represents a coming-full-circle of her work. 

Hawaii is a popular vacation spot among Canadians, but its architectural scene is often overlooked. However, the latest project by Walker Warner Architects, a compound of sorts that incorporates modern and Indigenous design, is hard to miss and even harder to disregard.

The way we organize our intimate, physical space has a lasting relationship with the way we think and experience life.

Ian Williams is concerned with social honesty expressed through immaculate craft. In a time when many novels try to jockey for the hippest or most woke, Williams deals with the messy ambiguities, which is why a family is the perfect vehicle.

Toronto designers Samer Shaath and Kevin Chan are the duo behind upstart firm NIVEK REMAS, and all their projects take on distinct forms to fit the specific situation.

Since other forms of travel have been all but eliminated for the time being, Canadian scenic drives might be the salve that the wanderlust-stricken soul is yearning for.

With so much of leisure shifting away from the city and perfectly paved roads, it makes sense as a way to reinvigorate the more than 100-year-old brand.