Architecture

Designer digs.

Discretion, quality, and unsurpassed craftsmanship define Bottega Veneta. Creative director Tomas Maier has been the driving force of the brand’s ascent to the very pinnacle of luxury since taking tenure in 2001.

An Ofist building renovation in Istanbul.

“The main idea for the design of the house was to not have too many ideas,” says interior architect Yasemin Arpaç of Istanbul-based Ofist. With partner Sabahattin Emir, Arpaç formulated an eminently simple—and versatile—living space for a 45-year-old bachelor.

A master’s mansion in Rosedale, Toronto.

A man’s home may be his castle, but in James Stewart’s case, it was also his showcase, workspace, pleasure palace, and personal concert hall.

Thinking outside the box.

The architecture of any home is usually extroverted or introverted in equal measure, but the interior of the Sharifi-ha residence in Tehran can become its façade and its façade can become the interior.

The Marino method.

Peter Marino is a self-proclaimed “black sheep” of the architecture world. Well known for his black leather attire, Marino has designed many of the world’s most forward-thinking retail temples.

The Italian abode on Lake Orta.

Alberto Alessi discovered what would become the site of his pursuit—to put work, leisure, family, and a passion for wine into some magical proportion—40 years ago, when he first saw Cascina Eugenia, a 350-year-old farmstead overlooking the island of San Giulio on Lake Orta in northwestern Italy.

A gleaming crown.

The Aga Khan Museum, an oasis on the outskirts of Toronto, is North America’s first museum for Islamic Art.

Raw and refined.

FROM THE ARCHIVE: One word architects use all the time is place. Good designs, we hear, should relate to place. Buildings should be placed in context, an artful façade can help define place, and so on. In my experience as both critic and professional colleague of architects, the same applies to their public personas.