Architecture

Mid-century classic.

There are several morals to the story of PH1, a residential project in the Preston Hollow neighbourhood of Dallas, Texas. First, it is a story about the vitality of modern design in Texas and a story about how successful design can be when architects and interior designers work closely together.

Envisioning an art gallery.

Last week, Vancouver was formally introduced to the architects who will transform a parking lot downtown into the new Vancouver Art Gallery. Senior partner Christine Binswanger and associate Simon Demeuse of Pritzker Architecture Prize–winning Swiss firm Herzog & de Meuron gave a public talk and shared some of their former work and initial impressions of the city.

Cultural commune.

An architectural luminary and a fashion-house great will come together in Paris this fall with the opening of the Fondation Louis Vuitton in a new Frank Gehry–designed building.

Regal renovation.

Aristocracy partied here. Laughter rang down its magnificent staircase. Over the years, the château passed from owner to owner, but in recent years had been empty when the couple purchased it from an English-Irish syndicate.

Drawing a new architecture.

Daniel Libeskind builds on very big ideas. Shards and fragments, symbolic undertones, and a philosophical approach inform the architect’s work.

Minimalist in Marrakesh.

At first glance, it’s unclear whether Fobe House is actually a house at all. It has the usual features of domesticity—doors, windows, rooms—but not in the usual places.

High tide.

While sailing on the turquoise waters near Miami, Florida in 1927, Harvey Firestone—founder of Firestone Tire—spotted a beachfront property that evoked a scene F. Scott Fitzgerald himself couldn’t have imagined better. A place for parties, social strata, and, when needed, repose.

Artistic growth.

The Aspen Art Museum has stood on the banks of Colorado’s Roaring Fork River since 1979, but after significant growth in visitors in recent years, it needed more room to stretch.

Big ideas.

Bjarke Ingels, with his reputation for challenging the traditional conventions of architecture, is set to make his mark on Canadian soil.