Summer 2014

NUVO Magazine Summer 2014 Cover featuring Atom Egoyan

Minimalist in Marrakesh.

At first glance, it’s unclear whether Fobe House is actually a house at all. It has the usual features of domesticity—doors, windows, rooms—but not in the usual places.

Artistic growth.

The Aspen Art Museum has stood on the banks of Colorado’s Roaring Fork River since 1979, but after significant growth in visitors in recent years, it needed more room to stretch.

Bringing quality wine to (the) heel.

The easiest way of locating Puglia (it’s the way it’s done there) is to say it’s the heel of the boot-shaped Italian peninsula. Wine has been made there for thousands of years.

Hawk-eyed.

It’s another beautiful day at Broadfield, the 2,300-hectare sporting club at Sea Island resort in the south of Georgia, and Chris Kennedy, a master falconer there, is eyeing the trees. “Falconry,” he says, “is all about patience.”

Portfolio of design.

The utter abstractness of a Mark Rothko canvas or the shocking sparseness of a Donald Judd installation may seem like odd inspiration for a modular kitchen system. Minimalist art, after all, is by its very nature impractical. Our cook spaces, on the other hand, have to perform a multitude of hard, fast, and often messy functions.

No one cares.

Call it an epidemic. With the rise in airport muddles, and travel travails, it’s become the customary thing, I’ve noticed, to kvetch—at length, and often to mere acquaintances—about one’s aisle-or-window woes.

Music lovers.

Remember when someone professed affection for another with a custom mixed tape? Creating one took effort and dedication, to carefully play the cassette while simultaneously recording on another.

Repetto, the original ballerina flat.

One day, a young ballerina came to Madame Repetto with a personal request. The 22-year-old blonde was about to make a movie and wished for ballet shoes in glamorous red. The young danseuse was none other than Brigitte Bardot; the film was And God Created Woman.

The classic amaro.

As far as world cultures go, no one does dinner quite like the Italians. Sitting down to the table is not just a gathering but also a sport. It’s no wonder those food-loving Italians also created one of the world’s most recognizable bitter digestifs, Fernet-Branca.