Art

Harvard’s Glass Flowers collection.

The avocado looks good enough to eat, as do the banana, six figs on a stem, mango, papaya, and cashew nuts. There is one catch though: they are all made of glass. These, together with 4,434 other exquisite botanical pieces, form Glass Flowers, a permanent collection at the Harvard Museum of Natural History.

Fragile beauty.

The Russian Imperial court was a place of enormous opulence during the 18th and 19th centuries, especially at formal banquets. Tables groaned with crystal, silver, and gold, and as many as 300 different dishes. A taste of this is available at the Hermitage Amsterdam.

Rodez retreat.

Journey deep into southwest France and you’ll reach the town of Rodez, two hours north of Toulouse, the final stretch of the road winding across storybook farmland to the base of a hill climbed by looping curves and crowned by a cathedral.

Fantastical art.

Rachel Feinstein is known for conjuring fairy-tale worlds in her dynamic paintings, sculptures, and mise en scènes.

Legend in the art world.

FROM THE ARCHIVE: In the art world, he isn’t just a star—he’s his own galaxy, and he’s credited with nothing less than changing the direction of abstract painting.

A heated tradition.

At Glashütte Lamberts, one of the last three mouth-blown sheet glass companies in Europe, it doesn’t take long for most would-be craftsmen to discover that they can’t take the heat.

A colourful three-stop tour.

It goes without saying that Las Vegas is a feast for the senses, but there’s another oft-overlooked side to this city. Long lauded for its performance arts, Vegas has seen a renewed interest in other art forms, resulting in visitors and locals alike discovering eye-catching works in surprising places.

Czar appeal.

“What is extraordinary about Fabergé is that he was so much more than just the imperial eggs, they are the absolute tip of the iceberg. They represent less than a quarter per cent of what he really produced.”

Steinunn Thórarinsdóttir at Mission Hill Family Estate.

Situated high above Okanagan Lake and sequestered behind 4,500-kilogram steel gates, Mission Hill welcomes almost 130,000 visitors annually, with good reason, as proprietor Anthony von Mandl built the property up around a foundation of, yes, award-winning wines, but also much more.