Art

A Los Angeles treasure trove.

Tucked away on a nondescript Hollywood street, a few hundred feet from a grey, thrumming cement-mixing plant, stands luxury boutique Just One Eye.

Artist's wonderland.

FROM THE ARCHIVE: Walking into David Altmejd’s studio feels like falling down a rabbit hole into some strange wonderland. Hidden on the top floor of a Long Island City warehouse that’s just one subway stop from Manhattan, the large, bright space is a hub of activity.

Investment opportunities in the world of fine art.

He is an imposing figure, this walking man: fully six feet tall, naked, his stick-thin limbs disproportionately long, his metallic skin clearly showing the rough handiwork of his creator.

Art and empire.

Bob Rennie’s love of art and his passion for collecting were sparked on a trip to San Francisco in 1974.

Mosaic maestro.

Most people know painter Amedeo Modigliani’s famous portraits of sad, eerily empty-eyed women with elongated faces. But have you ever seen them reinterpreted as mosaics?

A colourful three-stop tour.

It goes without saying that Las Vegas is a feast for the senses, but there’s another oft-overlooked side to this city.

Master caster.

Artist Tom Corbin’s studio, Corbin Bronze, buzzes with energy. The space, a converted Rosedale, Kansas, firehouse built in 1912, doubles as gallery and showroom, filled with Corbin artwork: paintings, bronze sculptures, and furniture.

Anything but formulaic.

Blending its sharp glassy angles into the Meatpacking District, the new Whitney Museum of American Art has shed its reputation among locals as the big grey box on the Upper East Side and put $422 million (U.S.) into a new building that appears to extend the look of the High Line out toward the Hudson River.