Art

Artist's wonderland.

FROM THE ARCHIVE: Walking into David Altmejd’s studio feels like falling down a rabbit hole into some strange wonderland. Hidden on the top floor of a Long Island City warehouse that’s just one subway stop from Manhattan, the large, bright space is a hub of activity.

The Forbidden City at the Royal Ontario Museum.

Amidst Beijing’s dense landscape lies the Forbidden City. For over 500 years, the halls of this royal residence remained a mystery to all but the emperor, his family, and those who served him.

Revitalizing the arts community.

The stakes are high in Las Vegas, and hotels and casinos pull out all the stops to produce such a spectacle. The statistics of the art world in Vegas, however, are surprising for different reasons.

Envisioning an art gallery.

Last week, Vancouver was formally introduced to the architects who will transform a parking lot downtown into the new Vancouver Art Gallery. Senior partner Christine Binswanger and associate Simon Demeuse of Pritzker Architecture Prize–winning Swiss firm Herzog & de Meuron gave a public talk and shared some of their former work and initial impressions of the city.

Stairway to memorabilia heaven.

FROM THE ARCHIVE: In ancient Egypt, a pyramid was referred to as mer; translated literally, mer means “place of ascendance”. Little wonder, then, that the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland resembles a super-sized glass pyramid.

Cultural commune.

An architectural luminary and a fashion-house great will come together in Paris this fall with the opening of the Fondation Louis Vuitton in a new Frank Gehry–designed building.

Artists examine the commons.

Scotland may have been dominating headlines as of late for its political referendum, but its art scene is well worth some ink as well, particularly in its capital city. As cultures become increasingly global, art that examines them assumes a new, multi-layered relevance.

Harvard’s Glass Flowers collection.

The avocado looks good enough to eat, as do the banana, six figs on a stem, mango, papaya, and cashew nuts. There is one catch though: they are all made of glass. These, together with 4,434 other exquisite botanical pieces, form Glass Flowers, a permanent collection at the Harvard Museum of Natural History.