Culture

Strings attached.

There was only ever one place that could be the setting for a museum devoted to the violin: Cremona, Italy.

Books by Adam Phillips, Mireille Silcoff, and Eimear McBride.

Consider for a moment the possibility that our very selves—our centred, internal, ever-present cluster of backstories we identify with the letter I—comprise as much everything we haven’t done as everything we’ve done. Everyone we haven’t become as much as who it is we find we have. Can anything useful be gleaned from the premise?

A man aloft.

FROM THE ARCHIVE: Ethan Hawke walks with the unhurried gait of a man with nowhere to go. His features—blue eyes, permanently terror-wide; a deep, implacable crease running down his forehead; the unchanging goatee—are pale in the light of a sunny afternoon in New York’s Chelsea neighbourhood.

The road to recognition.

FROM THE ARCHIVE: Adrien Brody does not give off the smooth-talking, sound bite–heavy suaveness that defines so many of his contemporaries. He is eloquent and humble, his voice deep and his laugh infectious, his words thoughtful and sincere.

Journey to jazz.

“Here’s the deal: jazz has never been my genre,” says Annie Lennox, sitting on the sofa in her manager’s office in Los Angeles. Nevertheless, one day Lennox found herself searching for jazz tunes on YouTube and she fell down the Internet rabbit hole.

Ian McEwan.

FROM THE ARCHIVE: Ian McEwan, the acclaimed author of Amsterdam, Atonement, and Saturday, among many other works, talks about his youthful “reckless pessimism”, his currently optimistic world view, and what it means to live a good life.

In vino veritas.

Wine has long been the subject of hyperbole, whether it’s Pliny the Elder’s statement that “In wine, there is truth” (in vino veritas), Jack Kerouac’s rework that “There’s wisdom in wine,” Ernest Hemingway’s assertion that “Wine is one of the most civilized things in the world,” or Michel Bettane’s more recent comment that “Fine wine is part of civilized life.”

Frederick Emerson Peters and Stephen Jacob Weinberg.

The final installment of our longstanding Scalawags series. Frederick Emerson Peters and Stephen Jacob Weinberg were born to be outrageous miscreants.

Enigma of Einaudi.

Audiences clearly adore Ludovico Einaudi, if the demands for encores and multiple standing ovations—which greeted him on his most recent North American tour—are any indication. Accompanied by a 10-piece orchestra, the Italian pianist and composer is expanding his popularity everywhere he goes.