Culture

Artistic growth.

The Aspen Art Museum has stood on the banks of Colorado’s Roaring Fork River since 1979, but after significant growth in visitors in recent years, it needed more room to stretch.

New ways of seeing.

What was once a fishing camp, situated at the confluence of the Metis and the St. Lawrence rivers in Quebec, is now home to one of Canada’s most imaginative gardens. In 1926, Elsie Reford began converting an estate left to her by her uncle George Stephen, the founder and first president of Canadian Pacific Railway.

Hawk-eyed.

It’s another beautiful day at Broadfield, the 2,300-hectare sporting club at Sea Island resort in the south of Georgia, and Chris Kennedy, a master falconer there, is eyeing the trees. “Falconry,” he says, “is all about patience.”

No one cares.

Call it an epidemic. With the rise in airport muddles, and travel travails, it’s become the customary thing, I’ve noticed, to kvetch—at length, and often to mere acquaintances—about one’s aisle-or-window woes.

Music lovers.

Remember when someone professed affection for another with a custom mixed tape? Creating one took effort and dedication, to carefully play the cassette while simultaneously recording on another.

A rare breed.

“You throw yourself on the benevolence of the world, believing some kind of wisdom will come of it.” —Canadian explorer Wade Davis

Shades of niceness.

FROM THE ARCHIVE: What is it to be Canadian? That’s probably impossible to define, and we’ve twisted ourselves in knots trying to figure that out. This Canada Day, we revisit a favourite essay on the subject.

Radio nowhere.

Gone are the glory days of the mainstream radio serials, but the concept has been revived in the form of Welcome to Night Vale. The popular podcast takes the form of a community radio show that describes the unnatural goings-on in the fictional, absurdly humorous desert town of Night Vale.

Czar appeal.

“What is extraordinary about Fabergé is that he was so much more than just the imperial eggs, they are the absolute tip of the iceberg. They represent less than a quarter per cent of what he really produced.”