London's finest.

The purpose of a hotel, at its primal core, is to provide a place to rest one’s head. Yet, under the cover of night, a time of relaxation for most is not a time of relaxation for others. At Claridge’s hotel in central London’s Mayfair neighbourhood, this holds especially true.

Many hands make light work.

It was similar interests that brought Vancouver-based creatives Annika Hagen and Nicole Fox together seven years ago in friendship, and it was some of those same affections—for art, for light, for community—that gave rise to LAMP, the Lighting Architecture Movement Project.

See-through.

WINTER WHITES: White rum, despite what many may think, is not only suited to settings of white sandy beaches in the summertime. When done right, it’s refreshing for frosty snow-covered evenings, too.

Scent of the season.

WINTER WHITES: New to Jo Malone’s growing unisex fragrance lineup is Wood Sage & Sea Salt, a breezy homage to the English seaside.

Spirits, not ghosts.

When Dan Aykroyd launched Crystal Head, a four-times-distilled vodka, the bottle was immediately reminiscent of his Ghostbusters days. What’s inside this clear, skull-shaped bottle has some merit, though.

Spherical seat.

WINTER WHITES: Marie Khouri insists that she is not a traditional designer. “I come to the design world from a true artist perspective,” she says. Having spent much of her career creating public art, she has recently ventured into producing benches and seating for the home.

Well-intentioned.

It all begins with water, and the act of giving with no expectations of receiving in return. It was a poignant lesson, delivered by Obakki founder Treana Peake to an audience of 2,500 in Vancouver last month for TEDxVancouver.

Tofino bound.

Sometimes it’s the journey. Sometimes it’s the destination. Sometimes it’s both. Tofino is a natural paradise in itself but it’s worth a visit simply for the drive.

Photographing history.

Beneath the farm houses in the tranquil French countryside exists a forgotten city—rooms and passages of narrow and twisting quarries where the stone is soft enough to carve with basic tools. These spaces were battlefield refuge for First World War soldiers and became home to countless sculptures, carvings, and artifacts as well.