FYI

Going for cold.

Founded in the 1950s, Paris-based Club Méditerranée—better known as Club Med—was the first all-inclusive resort company. In the decades since, the French brand has evolved.

A Piedmontese delicacy.

FROM THE ARCHIVE: For many years, there has been a specialized tool lying in the bottom of my kitchen drawer—a tool designed to shave papery slivers from that most precious fungus, the truffle.

What happens to your digital remains?

FROM THE ARCHIVE: Derek Miller is dead, to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that—because Miller himself told us. His final words, uploaded posthumously by a close friend on May 4, 2011, were both pithy and poignant: “Here it is. I’m dead, and this is the last post to my blog.” He was 41.

Underneath it all.

That old adage, sex sells, has played a role in Agent Provocateur’s success over its 20-year history—but it certainly hasn’t been the only factor.

Behind the clues.

Brandishing a pencil, a pen if he is confident, a puzzler turns to the Arts & Leisure section of The New York Times, scans the page, finds his quarry, and settles in for a fight.

Luxe Cabos.

The One&Only Palmilla: an expansive beachfront retreat that continues to define—and immortalize—Mexico glamour. Designed as an intimate waterfront hacienda for the mid-20th century’s rising rich and famous, the initial structures of One&Only Palmilla attracted 1950s Hollywood royalty like Lucille Ball, Bing Crosby, and John Wayne.

Keep your fork—there’s pie.

Pie is the quintessential comfort food, imbued with memory and nostalgia. Almost everyone has a pie story to tell, whether it’s how Grandma’s house smelled as she set about her baking on a summer afternoon or the jokes that flew around the dinner table as dessert was dished out after a Thanksgiving feast.

Unabashedly unique.

Peculiar. Unusual. Odd. These aren’t descriptors that companies generally lean on when trying to sell a product. Hendrick’s Gin, however, hangs its tattered top hat on being delightfully strange.

Finely tuned.

Bebel Gilberto may have grown up the daughter of João Gilberto, the father of bossa nova, but when it came to appreciating her dad’s artistry, she was a typical teenager. “He’d be playing guitar and I’d tell him, ‘I want to hear something different!’ ” she recalls, “and I’d turn the radio on.”