FROM THE ARCHIVE: In San Francisco, a city where everyone is working on the next big thing, and with plenty of coffee houses to fuel those working minds, a tea shop on Valencia Street in the Mission district stands still amidst the buzz: the newest addition to the city’s Samovar Tea family.

Remember when someone professed affection for another with a custom mixed tape? Creating one took effort and dedication, to carefully play the cassette while simultaneously recording on another.

Perfumer Lyn Harris first became aware of her fondness for scents during childhood visits to her grandparent’s home in the Scottish Highlands. “They grew berries, fruits, and flowers in their walled garden,” she remembers.

There’s a concept in Denmark that roughly translates to the idea of being cozy. For many, a form of hygge is to spend time nesting somewhere pleasant. So it is no surprise that, in a nation of domestic dwellers and cold winter months, great industrial design is such a prominent feature inside the home.

Founded by husband-and-wife duo Alessandra Tabacchi and Franco Mariotti in 1998 after leaving their careers in fashion, the pair focused their efforts on sourcing beautiful vintage pieces—a unique interior design model at that time.

On the quiet end of East 6th Street in Austin, Texas sits Easy Tiger: a bake shop, eatery, and beer garden. The multi-purpose establishment, cloaked in wild ivy and overlooking quaint Waller Creek, invites in those curious about its seemingly contradictory offerings and encourages them to relax, stay awhile.

One of the main charms of central Amsterdam is its Renaissance architecture. Just northwest of Rembrandt Square—named after Dutch master painter Rembrandt van Rijn—sits a prime example, the Pathé Tuschinski theatre.

Small fleeting establishments from enterprising individuals have been popping up for years: a temporary shop of artisan goods, a one-time dinner in the back of a gallery. So it is no surprise, as with most things that catch fire, that larger, recognized brands have begun to host their own editions too.

Housed within two glass warehouse buildings designed by architect Hans Peter Hagens, Torvehallerne is Copenhagen’s most popular public market and the city’s first central food hall.

When it comes to artisan craftsmanship, there are few things more universally warming than that of fresh baked bread, and at Faubourg Paris, the humble loaf is getting the respect it deserves.