Affairs

Solitude in the age of screens.

There were then two glowing screens atop my desk; three, if you count my yappy little phone. I was a magazine editor at the time—or, as we now say, a “content creator.” Yet I spent my days not so much creating content as reacting to it.

A global initiative.

On October 16, 1945, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) was created, born from the idea that freedom from want of food can be achieved for the health and strength of all people.

Quinnology.

FROM THE ARCHIVE: Pat Quinn knows the score. “It’s a profession where people lose their jobs on a regular basis. I’ve been very fortunate to be asked to do something new each time it happened to me.” He never seems to lose sight of this, with his assistants, with his players, with himself.

Tech time.

If it is nothing else, the new Apple Watch is a wish—a fervent hope that lightning may indeed strike twice. You know, much like it did back in 2007, when the indomitable Steve Jobs pulled a nondescript glass-and-plastic brick out of his pocket and started a high-tech revolution the likes of which the world had never seen.

Speed bumps on the information superhighway.

Consider yourself on the road. Consider yourself part of a traffic jam. You’re moving, sure, but you’re in a thick soup of bumper-to-bumper mayhem with nothing but tailpipes to the left and road rage to the right. But wait; up ahead, the road widens. A luxury sedan whips down the open road. Then another. And another. But hang on, you’re not allowed. It’s for first-class customers only.

Handmade in Germany.

History may not repeat itself with the regularity of clockwork, but watch manufacturer Moritz Grossmann edges it closer to the mark. Christine Hutter, CEO, looked first to the past before founding the modern iteration of the company.

Dotting pages.

In the first few pages of Ernest Hemingway’s memoir, A Moveable Feast, he describes his time at a Parisian café, noting his surroundings. The famed writer was an early adopter of Moleskine’s classic notebooks.

Blame game.

Whoever thought up the “war is good for business” thing might want to check out the action on the Moscow Exchange this year. As the crisis in Ukraine came to a boil at the end of February, investor appetite for Russian equities went into a deep freeze, and the country’s benchmark Russian Trading System (RTS) stock-market index lost 19 per cent in a matter of weeks.